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Kidde recalls two of its Nighthawk smoke/CO alarms citing failure risk

Kidde Alarm

One of the largest fire, smoke and carbon monoxide alarms manufacturing company has recalled two of its Nighthawk smoke/CO alarms citing possibilities of failure of these alarms in certain situations.

The company has urged its customers to check the alarm installed in their homes, in this case it will be a white, round device measuring five to six inches in diameter, and if it is either KN-COSM-IBCA and KN-COSM-ICA they should stop using them immediately. Also, they should contact the company for either a free replacement or a discount on a new detector, based on the manufacture date. The defective alarms were manufactured between June 2004 and March 2011, the company revealed. While eight incidents have been reported so far because of the alarm failures, no injuries or fatalities have been reported.

Thunder Bay Fire Rescue has issued an advisory and warning asking homeowners and tenants to check the devices in their homes and if they find either of these two installed, they should contact Kidde Canada directly and have them replaced. The combination alarms are hard-wired into the home’s electrical power and have a compartment on the back where homeowners can install a replaceable 9V backup battery.

According to Health Canada, the alarms can fail to continue to chirp when reaching the seven-year end-of-life, if the batteries are replaced. In the case of the model without a battery backup, the problem can occur if power to the alarm is cut and then restored. The Federal department says that whatever may be the case, consumers could falsely believe that their alarm is still in working order and that it will warn them in case of fire or carbon monoxide incident in the home.

Tips about smoke/CO alarms

  • Make sure you have a working smoke/CO alarm on every level and in every bedroom of the home.
  • Make sure you test these alarms at least once a month.
  • Replace the batteries when you change your clocks for daylight saving time.
  • Replace smoke alarms after 10 years from the manufacturers date.

About the author

Ravi Mandalia

Ravi Mandalia is a professional technology and science editor with over six years of experience. Ravi has been working with some of the biggest names in online media industry in the UK and US.

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